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Middle East

January 1, 2006

Ahead of our Middle East Families in Business conference on ­6th April we ask whether family business in the Middle East must reform if they are to survive in a global economy. Leading business figures in the region think so. By Scott McCulloch

Scott Mcculloch is editor of Families in Business.

Ahead of our Middle East Families in Business conference on ­6th April we ask whether family business in the Middle East must reform if they are to survive in a global economy. Leading business figures in the region think so. By Scott McCulloch

Do private equity investors find family businesses attractive and what are they really looking for?

January 1, 2006

The Builder family is a large clan that is well-known in the Middle East as successful experts in resort development and management. The patriarch of the family, Ahmet Builder, is a classic example of a ‘self-made’ man.

The Builder family is a large clan that is well-known in the Middle East as successful experts in resort development and management. The patriarch of the family, Ahmet Builder, is a classic example of a 'self-made' man. He began life as a labourer, rose to a high level of responsibility in the labour unions, and eventually started his own manufacturing company. In the past 10 years the company has been aggressively developing hotels and resort communities.

September 1, 2005

The Middle East is a burgeoning market and there are many wealthy families needing specialist financial services. Philippe Jouard describes the challenges facing the private banking sector in meeting the cultural and financial demands of this clientele

Philippe Jouard is head of private banking at Dexia

The Middle East is a burgeoning market and there are many wealthy families needing specialist financial services. Philippe Jouard describes the challenges facing the private banking sector in meeting the cultural and financial demands of this clientele

March 1, 2004

Spot an opportunity and see it through could be the Khayyat family motto. But ‘one door closes and another one opens’ seems more apt for the canny family behind Meatco, Jordan’s masters of survival and economic opportunism

Scott McCulloch is Editor of Families in Business magazine.

Spot an opportunity and see it through could be the Khayyat family motto. But 'one door closes and another one opens' seems more apt for the canny family behind Meatco, Jordan's masters of survival and economic opportunism

March 1, 2004

Family businesses in the Middle East generate billions of dollars in revenue. But times are changing and the political and economic outlook is a mixed bag for some 20 countries associated with the region. Membership in the World Trade Organisation, say commentators, will have a profound affect on family businesses.

Scott McCulloch is Editor of Families in Business magazine.

Family businesses in the Middle East generate billions of dollars in revenue. But times are changing and the political and economic outlook is a mixed bag for some 20
countries associated with the region. Membership in the World Trade Organisation, say commentators, will have a profound affect on family businesses.

March 1, 2004

Corporate social responsibility sounds cool, but seems a contra­diction in terms in an ever-aggressive global business landscape. But it is part of the business remit for Bahrain’sKanoo Group of companies

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

Corporate social responsibility sounds cool, but seems a contra­diction in terms in an ever-aggressive global business landscape. But it is part of the business remit for Bahrain'sKanoo Group of companies

January 1, 2004

I’ve been planning my retirement for some 15 years. I keep a sharp eye on my pension schemes and investments, and quietly rejoice that I never sunk my hard-earned cash into IT companies – firms that rode a tsunami of venture capital in the late 1990s only to come crashing down as the dot-com boom soured.

I've been planning my retirement for some 15 years. I keep a sharp eye on my pension schemes and investments, and quietly rejoice that I never sunk my hard-earned cash into IT companies – firms that rode a tsunami of venture capital in the late 1990s only to come crashing down as the dot-com boom soured. I've stuck to diamond mines, mutual funds and property, after all, there's nothing wrong with hedging your bets.

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