Vimeo
LinkedIn
Instagram
Share |

leadership

March 1, 2006

As a business family moves through the progressive stages of transition, there are the associated challenges of each stage to confront. None more so than when the family has exceeded the cousin collaboration. But don’t lose the family bond, writes John Ward

John Ward is principle of the Family Business Consulting Group. www.efamilybusiness.com

As a business family moves through the progressive stages of transition, there are the associated challenges of each stage to confront. None more so than when the family has exceeded the cousin collaboration. But don't lose the family bond, writes John Ward

November 1, 2004

The leader of a family business can define the identity of the business. Nigel Nicholson guides any potential or actual leaders with the what, who and how of smart leadership

Nigel Nicholson is Professor of Organisational Behaviour at London Business School.

The leader of a family business can define the identity of the business. Nigel Nicholson guides any potential or actual leaders with the what, who and how of smart leadership

September 1, 2004

Ignoring the strategic landscape of the business itself, family firms can focus too heavily on leadership transition because of emotional reasons, says Andrew Keyt. Has succession overshadowed the harder long-term business goals?

Andrew Keyt is president of the US chapter of the FBN and executive director of the Chicago Family Business Center.

Ignoring the strategic landscape of the business itself, family firms can focus too heavily on leadership transition because of emotional reasons, says Andrew Keyt. Has succession overshadowed the harder long-term business goals?

March 1, 2004

Many a family firm has crashed and burned amid recrimination, but many remain the world’s most respected enterprises. So just what is the role of leadership and family culture in the chemistry of success and failure?

Nigel Nicholson is Professor of Organisational Behaviour at London Business School. Åsa Björnberg is Research Assistant at London Business School on the LIFBRI (Leadership in Family Business Research Initiative).
(This work is supported under ESRC grant  – RES-051-27-0086. For a more detailed report of the survey findings or further information contact the London Business School. www.london.edu/family_business/)

January 1, 2004

What can the members of business-owning families learn from Agincourt, from a contemporary Paris orchestra, from the sometimes bewildering world of parenting adolescents and from a septuagenarian’s scholarly wisdom based on more than half a century spent working with and studying leaders and leadership?

Barbara Murray is executive director of the Family Business Network.

November 1, 2003

There are fundamental differences in the assumptions and practices of family and non-family firms. While non-family firms can learn much from the ‘family business paradigm’, family firms need to be careful not to ignore the perspectives of efficient markets, asset leverage, strategic revolution, and economically driven personal leadership

John L Ward is the Co-Director of the Center for Family Enterprises at Kellogg Graduate School of Management (USA) and the Wild Group Professor of Family Business at IMD (Switzerland). He serves on the boards of four family companies in Europe and the USA.

June 1, 2003

Leadership is an important element in running a successful family business. Four of the eminent thinkers in the field of family business discuss its different meaning and forms

Barbara Murray is Consultant Editor for Families in Business magazine.

Leadership is an important element in running a successful family business. Four of the eminent thinkers in the field of family business discuss its different meaning and forms

At the top of the list of names of those people who are best known and respected for their substantial and ongoing contribution to the world of family business theory, practice and education you will find the names of John Davis, Kelin Gersick, Ivan Lansberg and John Ward.

April 1, 2002

I was talking recentlyto the Chairman of a financial services organisation, telling him about my interest in family business and my desire to establish a new international centre for the study of leadership in family firms at London Business School.

I was talking recentlyto the Chairman of a financial services organisation, telling him about my interest in family business and my desire to establish a new international centre for the study of leadership in family firms at London Business School. The Chairman was interested, but after a while asked "Aren't they a thing of the past in the UK?"This is not the first time I have heard this belief expressed, and by people who you might think would know better. Around three years ago it was estimated that 75% of all British businesses were family-owned and -managed.

Click here >>
Close