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corporate social responsibility

March 9, 2021

It was recently reported in the British press that bragging rights could be earned amongst ultra-wealthy families and their family offices by paying more tax, not less. But how did we get here and what does it mean for family offices in the future, particularly as governments around the world count the financial costs of the Covid-19 pandemic?

It was recently reported in the British press that bragging rights could be earned amongst ultra-wealthy families and their family offices by paying more tax, not less.

April 7, 2020

Dilmah, the global Sri Lankan family tea producing business, has moved swiftly to safeguard its workforce and adapt its manufacturing when confronted by the coronavirus, and calls for humane family values to recalibrate the post-Covid-19 world.

Dilmah, the global Sri Lankan family tea producing business, has moved swiftly to safeguard its workforce and adapt its manufacturing when confronted by the coronavirus, and calls for humane family values to recalibrate the post-Covid-19 world.

December 20, 2017

A.G. Sulzberger becomes sixth family member to head New York Times, South African second-generation retailer Wiese resigns as Steinhoff chair, Ford Foundation invests in social impact with new director.

A.G. Sulzberger becomes sixth family member to head New York Times

Fifth-generation Arthur Gregg (A.G.) Sulzberger is to become the publisher of The New York Times taking over from his father, Arthur O (A.O.) Sulzberger (pictured), Jr who has held the position since 1992.

Currently its deputy publisher, the 37-year-old will become publisher on 1 January, 2018—the sixth member of the Ochs-Sulzberger family to hold the position since its patriarch Adolph S Ochs bought the paper in 1896.

June 15, 2017

What will it take to make socially and environmentally responsible investment the “new normal”? The answer may lie with the next generation, a conference in London heard this week.

What will it take to make socially and environmentally responsible investment the “new normal”? The answer may lie with the next generation, a conference in London heard this week.

The influence high net worth Millennials exert on their parents when it comes to impact investing was a theme that came up again and again at The Economist’s Impact Investing Europe conference in London today.

February 5, 2013

Family businesses shouldn’t think they are more ethical because of their adherence to stewardship and long-term planning.
 

Should businesses be ethical beyond what is required by the law of the land? Does ethics make good business sense? It’s probably true to say that neither of these weighty questions are top of the agenda as boardrooms sit down to sign off budgets for 2013, or otherwise. But now is the time they should be.

June 29, 2011

Can you be good and still make a lot of money? In the year 2000 the $239 billion California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), the biggest pension fund in the US, dumped its investments in China, Colombia and the Philippines because of their poor democratic records, as well as pulling money out of the tobacco industry.

Can you be good and still make a lot of money? In the year 2000 the $239 billion California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS), the biggest pension fund in the US, dumped its investments in China, Colombia and the Philippines because of their poor democratic records, as well as pulling money out of the tobacco industry.

May 5, 2010

Many business owners like to claim they are socially responsible, but according to Sonia Tsao, fifth-generation family member of Singapore-based conglomerate The IMC Group, it is the next generation who should be the flag bearers for this movement.

Many business owners like to claim they are socially responsible, but according to Sonia Tsao, fifth-generation family member of Singapore-based conglomerate The IMC Group, it is the next generation who should be the flag bearers for this movement.

March 31, 2010

As we reported last week, family businesses were very well represented in a list of the world’s most ethical companies. But what defines an ethical company and how can family businesses – traditionally seen as being inherently socially responsible – improve what they do in this field, asks Marc Smith

As we reported last week, family businesses were very well represented in a list of the world's most ethical companies (click here to read our coverage of the story).

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